The Reading Strategies Book Study: Goal 4

Hey y’all!  I hope your year is happily, or almost happily, underway.  I had kiddos last Friday and this will be our first full week together.  I am elated to be in second grade so I can get my hands dirty using this amazing book with the rest of the #ReadingStrategiesCrew.  I am co-responsible (not a word) for Goal #4 – FLUENCY.  My girl, Jennie, at Open Mind Literacy will be sharing her thoughts on this goal as well.

*Quick story – Jennie and I were college and sorority friends back in the day at Miami University… HOLLA!  We have since reconnected over our love of #TpT and all things LITERACY.

Goal 4: Teaching Fluency – Reading with phrasing, intonation, and automaticity

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Two of my favorite bits from Goal 4:

Page 104, “It’s important that in our attempts to teach children to read fluently, we don’t send the message that reading is just about performing.”

Page 105, “In most cases, if phrasing is appropriate, the pace will be too.”

Fluency, like many of the magic moving parts in reading, when we see it “click” for kids, it clicks.  It is interesting to watch students “know what to do” but the actual act of reading in such a way, with fluency, is a challenge and requires practice.  This is where I shamelessly plug the read aloud and the importance for babes to hear us modeling the appropriate parts of fluent reading.  But I will also plug the importance of the act of reading aloud… over and over and over so they have time to make it work for them.

Goal #4 has the following strategies…

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Can I just say the organization of this book is just so easy, y’all!  You can narrow in on the specific genre, text level/type, skill and strategy.  This book was made to be used by teachers, for readers!  I picked three of my favorites for you…

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4.4 Make the Bumpy Smooth — Y’all, the power of reading and re-reading is real!  This strategy helps students understand phrasing.  It is critical for young readers to practice phrasing because they have the opportunity to say and hear the words the way they were supposed to be read.  I like to have students read choppy “on purpose” and then read smoothly.  I give them the visual of a chef chopping a veggie.  The chef can chop-chop-chop and then they smoothly swipe the pits into the dish.  Readers read-each-word, and then “read each word” in a smooth phrase.

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4.7 Warm Up and Transfer – Use an independent level text to ramp up fluency.  Transfer the voice from the independent text to an instructional level text.  Simple connection for kids: warming up is good for your body before sports and for your brain while reading.  This is a clear, concrete example for kids!

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4.21 Read It How the Author Tells You (Tags) – This is a big one because it causes students to consider what Fountas and Pinnell call “about” the text features.  Students are challenged think about the author’s craft in writing text.  Students have to think about the author’s word choice and to interpret and execute them while reading.

Things to consider and points for reflection:

How do you explicitly support fluency in your classroom and WHY?  Do you use certain texts or anchor examples for fluency practice?  How do you monitor fluency?  Do you allow students the opportunity to hear themselves reading fluently?

Check out the rest of the #ReadingStrategiesCrew as we make our way through this bomb-diggity book.  Love to Teach A Latte is up next on August 17.  If you missed any of the previous chapters, check them our here:  Goal 1: Literacy Loving Gals, Goal 2: My First Grade Happy Place, Goal 3: The Literacy Spot.

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One thought on “The Reading Strategies Book Study: Goal 4

  1. Pingback: The Reading Strategies Book - Inspire Me ASAP

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